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TESTIMONIALS

TESTIMONIALS

Dear Basketball shooting coach,
Really love the PDF,
It teaches me a lot about shooting, and even more.
Thanks,
J. from Hong Kong

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Hey coach just finished reading up your shooting book for the second time your principles have really made my shooting improve.
D.
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My name is C....,
I just finished reading your book, and found it exactly what i needed to read. I have begun the first part of the system, just practicing off the top corner of the glass and can already feel my confidence as a shooter growing.
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First off let me say that I was amazed at how much I learned when I read your manual on shooting earlier this spring and saw a significant improvement in my shot.
O.
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Your eBook is great. Thank you very much.
Kind Regards,
D.
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How to Shoot A Jump Shot

- JUMP SHOT -
THIS IS BRAIN TRAINING!!!
WE ARE TRAINING YOUR BRAIN TO SHOOT JUMP SHOTS

Some say jump shots are more difficult than set shots.  Some say jump shots are easier than set shots.  What difference does it make?  You're going to be shooting both during a game.  But I'll say this about set shots - if you're taking a set shot and you’re not trained in the ‘Mental Aspect’ of shooting a basketball, your mind can make that set shot seem more difficult than it really is.  Set shots take time.  Time gives players time to think, if a negative thought sneaks into that think time - that negative thought can create doubt, a missed shot and a missed opportunity.  You’ve already been trained in the ‘Mental Aspect’ of shooting a basketball, or you wouldn’t be reading this jump shot section [would you?] so set shots do not present problems for you.

We've covered jump shot mechanics.  We've covered your focus and follow through.  You should review both more often than what you think is necessary.  Jump shots happen off a dribble, off a pass, and off a rebound.  It's interesting that the ‘triple threat position’ comes into play in each circumstance.  ‘Triple threat position’ is the stance from which you can shoot, pass, or dribble.  The 'triple threat positon' is normally referred to when a player comes to a jump stop on both feet, allowing either foot to be a pivot foot.  It's also the stance players should have when receiving a pass, when ending a dribble or landing from a rebound with the ball.  It looks like a half-squat.  If you're in this half-squat when pulling up from a dribble you can go straight up for your jump shot, affecting a quick release off your dribble.  If you're in this half-squat when receiving a pass you can go straight up for your jump shot, affecting a quick release off a pass

Always warm up then dynamic stretch before playing basketball.  Begin all shooting sessions with the ‘Warming-Up’ section before attempting other shots. 

Whenever possible before catching a pass you can quicken your release a little more by using a little dance step, the two-step-shuffle: you shuffle one step toward the basket, in the triple threat position, while the pass is in the air, and as the ball is reaching your hands you shuffle the second step toward the basket and launch your jump shot.  The word shuffle describes the timing and the size of the steps you’re taking, a rhythmic two step shuffle toward the basket while receiving the pass.  If you’re not in that half-squat position then you must take the time to squat before shooting which eliminates your ‘quick release.’  The best practice for getting comfortable with the half-squat or ‘triple threat position’ is defensive drills and any properly executed squatting exercises.  There is really not a time during games or practices that a player should be standing around stiff legged (knees locked).  From a knees locked stance players cannot have a ‘quick’ first step, a ‘quick’ release on their shot, or be able to explode for a rebound or quickly transition from one end of the court or one side of the court to the other.

After burning in a shooters muscle memory, developing a FOCUS ON THAT HOOK ON THE FAR SIDE OF THE RIM, and following through by keeping your eyes on the magnified hook until the ball goes through the rim - then defense is your best offensive practice.  Of course you need to learn and practice your offense, but great defensive players learn to execute their offense better then poor to average defensive players.  A great defensive player must understand offense.  Great offensive players often are the best defensive players.  Great defensive efforts trigger team offensive mindsets and frequently kick a team into it's next gear.  Defense demands more from you mentally and physically, but once physical conditioning is a non-issue basketball is a mental game. 

How high is a jump shot shooter supposed to jump?  Well, how high do you need to get to shoot over your defender?  How much umpff do you need to launch a three or a long distance two pointer?  So the elusive answer to the question how high is a jump shot shooter supposed to jump is somewhere between 1/4" and 3' depending on your situation. 

Jump shot shooters should go straight up.  Why?  When your body is moving up or down you have the same relationship to the basket as if you're standing still and the basket is moving up or down.  During a jump shot you are essentially shooting at a moving target (a basket moving down).  Adding a forward or backward motion creates even more movement of your target and you’re making your own jump shot more difficult to shoot therefore aiding your opponent. 

Some coaches say to release the basketball on your way up.  Some coaches say to release the ball at the apex of your jump.  The defense will dictate when to release the basketball.  What’s important is not thinking about when to release the ball, unless the game clock or shot clock is dictating your release. 

We're training your brain to shoot through distractions presented to you DURING A GAME.  Rush this next process and you're wasting precious time.  Sure you'll get better than you were even by rushing this process, but why rush it?  In just a short few days you'll have completed the process as it's laid out for you right here.  Give yourself all the time you need to be the best jump shot shooter you can be.  Honing you ability to instantly locate and then grow that hook on the far side of the rim should be done using three to eight foot set shots.  Shooting these short (flat footed) set shots allows you time to find and focus on that hook on the far side of the rim while simultaneously recalling the MAGNIFIED HOOK before you shoot.  The act of focusing on the hook gives your conscious mind a task to perform.  The act of recalling that HOOK you saw through the magnifier is actually engaging your imagination while you're shooting.  In order to see the hook LARGE you must be in your imagination.  Once your imagination has been engaged it will continue your shot for you.  Follow-through with your eyes by keeping them on the HOOK until the ball goes through the hoop.  Give yourself a week, or more, of shooting hundreds of three foot to eight foot set shots daily before attempting any short range jump shots. 

When you begin shooting jump shots, shoot only three to four footers.  The act of focusing on the hook gives your conscious mind a task to perform.  In order to see the hook LARGE you must be in your imagination.  Once your imagination has been engaged it will continue your shot for you.  Follow-through with your eyes keeping them on the HOOK until the ball goes through the hoop.  Shoot hundreds of jump shots at this three to four foot range moving all around the key.  After a couple of hundred if you're shooting at a 70% clip or better on the final 20, move out one more foot and shoot another couple of hundred.  If you're shooting at a 70% clip on the final 20, take another step back and continue the process. 

Stay within in that eight foot range for the first three days of your jump shot shooting!  Why?  Well, what are we doing here?  We're training your brain to instantly locate that hook on the far side of the rim which triggers the MANIFIED HOOK in your mind before you shoot.  You want to give your brain the time it needs to adapt!  If you rush these exercises you diminish your ultimate shooting percentage; you sabotage your own basketball shooting career.  And think real hard about this; being able to shoot with 100% accuracy during practice means nothing if you're game shooting percentage is under 60%.  We're training your brain to shoot through the distractions presented DURING A GAME.  Rush this process and you're wasting precious time.  Sure you'll get better than you were even by rushing this process, but why rush it?  In just a few short days you'll have completed the process as it's laid out for you right here.  Give yourself the time you need to be the best jump shot shooter you can be.


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